Again, sorry for interrupting your regularly scheduled pieces of various nonsense, for yet another important message.

It’s October, folks! Halloween is around the corner, but more importantly its Breast Cancer Awareness Month; a cause near and dear to my heart.

Every October, individuals, businesses, and organizations celebrate National Breast Cancer Awareness Month (Mahoney & Tang, 2017, p. 71). “The Susan G. Komen Foundation reported an increase in interest and contribution following popular viral memes (Mahoney & Tang, 2017, p. 72).”

This is not surprising considering that memes serve a dual purpose of bringing awareness and entertaining at the same time. This is also a great way of mobilizing an audience but also encouraging activism.

Source: AskPatty.com: https://caradvice.askpatty.com/ask_patty_/2015/10/askpattys-breast-cancer-awareness-tip-4-breast-cancer-can-occur-in-men-too.html.

1 in 8 women are affected by breast cancer in the United States. That’s the statistic. But men are also affected by breast cancer. Yes. It can and does happen. 2.7 out of every 100,000 black men and 1.9 out of every 100,000 white men are diagnosed with breast cancer (Breast Cancer in Men: Statistics, 2020).

It is estimated that 520 men will die from breast cancer in 2020 (Breast Cancer in Men: Statistics, 2020).

There are disparities between black men and white men with this disease, that most men and even some women aren’t aware of. For example, breast cancer in men may occur at any age, but typically occurs between the ages of 60 and 70, and make up less than 1% of all cases of breast cancer (National Cancer Institute, 2020).

There are numerous causes for men to get breast cancer. Such as these risk factors, high estrogen levels, familial history of breast cancer, cirrhosis of the liver, or Klinefelter syndrome (a genetic disorder) (National Cancer Institute, 2020).

There are tons of organizations out there that one can donate to, or participate in civic activities such as the Susan G. Komen’s Breast Cancer Foundation’s Walk/Race For the Cure. Or you can donate to Susan G. Komen’s Breast Cancer Foundation here.

You can don the Pink Ribbon to show support for Breast Cancer Awareness, dye your hair pink for the month of October (as I’ve been known to do), or organize your own fundraiser for breast cancer research.

References:

Breast Cancer in Men: Statistics. (2020, January). Retrieved October 7, 2020, from Cancer.net: https://www.cancer.net/cancer-types/breast-cancer-men/statistics#:~:text=This%20year%2C%20an%20estimated%202%2C620,out%20of%20every%20100%2C000%20men).

Mahoney, L. M., & Tang, T. (2017). Strategic Social Media. Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom: Wiley Blackwell.

National Cancer Institute. (2020, September 24). Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ) – Patient Version. Retrieved October 7, 2020, from National Institute of Health – National Cancer Institute: https://www.cancer.gov/types/breast/patient/male-breast-treatment-pdq#_69

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